Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce, 1842 - 1913/14?
The Devil's Dictionary

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Born: 24 June 1842, Meigs County, Ohio

Bierce wrote satiric "dictionary" entries as part of his newspaper columns between 1881 and 1906. He first suggested a Comic Dictionary in a column he wrote for the News Letter of San Francisco in 1869. Between 1877 and 1878 he twice used "The Demon's Dictionary" as a column title in The Argonaut, a weekly San Francisco magazine he edited. Between 1881 and 1906 he used the title The Devil's Dictionary for 88 columns in The Wasp, another San Francisco magazine where he was editor-in-chief, each including 15 to 20 definitions. Doubleday published The Cynic's Wordbook in 1906, featuring 500 definitions from A to L, and in 1911 Volume 7 of The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce was titled The Devil's Dictionary and included another 500, all of which were drawn from his columns for The Wasp. In 1967 an expanded version was published with an additional 851 definitions drawn from work other than the Wasp columns. Our collection is rather smaller than that, but still a great deal of fun to read.

Biography from Wikipedia and QOTD Main Entry

Ambrose Bierce's Devil's Dictionary quotes:

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Quotes found : 271 — (15 per page, this is page 1 of 19) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Next

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